Baby Names Inspired by Movies

Kylo_Ren_Article
DailyMail.com just published an article claiming that the name “Kylo” is fastest growing baby name in the U.S.–because it’s the name of the villain in the latest Star Wars movie.

I came across this article on DailyMail.com this week and it got me thinking that there must be a lot of people out there naming their babies after movie characters–maybe even characters from television series and novels.

So I ask, would you name your baby after a character (good or bad) from a movie or book–popular or not?

The article also mentions the decline of names that have received “bad press” of sorts. Like, ahem, “Caitlyn,” “Hillary,” and “Donald.” Which makes me wonder, would you avoid a name that was recently in the spotlight even if it had special meaning or significance to your family?

I truly believe that baby naming is part process and part matter of the heart. But, this is a tough baby naming issue. You don’t want the most perfect name to get away simply based on “principle”. I say, honor your heart before jumping on the bandwagon or letting it pass by! Because, your heart is never wrong and you’ll always be confident with your name choice.

Baby Name Regrets

BringingUpBebe
Bringing Up Bebe by Pamela Druckerman

Baby names and regret? Yikes. I’m not sure I would have ever thought it was possible to regret—or at least have second thoughts—about your baby’s name, but Pamela Druckerman discusses in her book Bringing Up Bébé her inner turmoil after naming her twins (boys, fraternal).

We settle on Joel—whom we’ll only ever call Joey—and Leo, who defies all attempts at nicknames. …Amazingly, I still find time to be neurotic. I’m obsessed with the idea that we’ve given the boys the wrong names, and that I should go back to the town hall and switch them. I spend my few leisure minutes ruminating on this. …Before the little ceremony [circumcision], I confess to the mohel that I fear I’ve given the boys the wrong names and that I may need to switch them. He doesn’t offer me any spiritual advice. But being French, he explains that the bureaucracy I’d need to go through to do this would be a labyrinthine and excruciating. Somehow this information, plus the consecration of the circumcisions, erases my doubt. After the ceremony, I never worry about their names again.

Now that I reread this passage, I don’t know whether Druckerman means she wanted to flip flop her twins’ names (Joey becomes Leo and Leo becomes Joey) or if she means she wanted to give them completely different names. I can find the humor in the situation: the self-admitted neurotic nature of this obsession. Been there and done that postpartum!

I can’t help to wonder, though, have any other parents regretted or had second thoughts on the name they gave their baby? What would you do about it—change it legally, call them by a nickname? Would you ever admit it? Do you have a “friend” who has experienced this? (Wink!)

Baby Naming: Happy Names According to Penny Marshall’s Mom

MotherNuts

I read Penny Marshall’s (whose full name is actually Carole Penny Marshall) memoir, My Mother Was Nuts a few years back. Her explanation of her and her siblings’ names caught my attention:

If you notice, our names all have double letters and end in a Y. Pronouncing them, as my mother once explained, made you smile. Gar-REE. Ron-KNEE. Pen-KNEE. They were happy names, she said. Other names, such as Susan, Paula, and Katherine, were flat. To her, they were sad names. ‘And Penny,’ my mother wrote in my baby book, ‘is always ready for a hardy laugh.’

When it came to naming her own daughter, Penny Marshall landed on Tracy, the name of a girl she had liked from camp. “Tracy was a happy name, as my mother would have said,” Penny writes.

I’ll admit, this stuck with me. For my own children, I tended to lean towards heritage names, but I’m also drawn to emotive names. Out of the two options I uttered to my husband right before my son’s birth, we ended up using the happier of the two names. To me, it just makes sense to have a happy name.

How about you? Does Penny Marshall’s mom’s reasoning make sense to you? Would you choose a name for your baby just because it sounded happy?

Name Mix-Ups

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Name tag required.

Did your mom yell out your siblings’ names before she got to yours? (Do YOU list out all of your children’s names before getting to the right one?) Ends up, we’re not losing our minds. This article from NPR explains why our brains scramble names. (We keep our loved ones’ names in the same “brain folder!”) This probably explains why when I was in elementary school I called my teachers “mom” at least once a year. Oops! But, my teachers were great!

When naming baby #2, #3…#100, you may worry about choosing a name that sounds too similar to your older children’s names. I say, don’t sweat it! You’re going to mix their names up anyway! Haha!

Are you expecting? Congratulations! If you need help figuring out how to go about the difficult task of picking a name for your baby, check out my guide, Choosing the Most Perfect Name for Your Baby: Demystifying the Naming Process & Honoring Your Heart.*

*Of course I earn money with each purchase of my guide, because I wrote it! But, this is my passion project and unless it gets Oprah-level attention, I won’t be retiring any time soon. I appreciate your support and I hope that my guide helps you select the most perfect name for your baby!

Do You Look Like Your Name?

I stumbled across an article about how people can identify someone based on their name with surprising accuracy. That is, we look like our names. I think there is a lot of cultural things going on with this.

But, it’s still fun to think about whether you look like your name. Have you ever been called the wrong name? By multiple people? I once was called “Heather” at my college job. Which probably had a lot to do with the fact that it was my cohort’s name. But then, I moved 300 miles back home for the summer and someone at work called me “Heather!”

To further (unscientifically) test this theory that we look like our names, I decided to do a Google image search of “Theresa” to see what other Theresas look like and if I fit in. (My pic is in the upper right, highlighted in red for comparison.)

NameGame_01
Such lovely Theresas.

I guess we all look pretty similar. And, as a bonus Theresa Lopez-Fitzgerald, from the NBC soap opera Passions, came up as the first image! Heck yes!

Google your first name. Do you look like the results?

And, if you’re expecting and trying to pick a name for your baby, check out my guide, Choosing the Most Perfect Name for Your Baby: Demystifying the Naming Process & Honoring Your Heart.*

*Of course I earn money with each purchase of my guide, because I wrote it! But, this is my passion project and unless it gets Oprah-level attention, I won’t be retiring any time soon. I appreciate your support and I hope that my guide helps you select the most perfect name for your baby!